Monday, July 3, 2017

Jon Thomas Wallis: Ink Slinger, Stalker, Trafficker, Would-Be Wife Killer?


Jon Thomas Wallis is many things to many people. Unfortunately for Wallis, to the Alabama Department of Corrections, he's a number.

Ink Slinger:




Those familiar with the art of tattooing would obviously call Jon Thomas Wallis an accomplished practitioner. Wallis himself liked the name "Ink Slinger" well enough to have it permanently inscribed on his neck.


 

Stalker:

Early on Monday morning September 7, 2009, Wallis was in a Florence bar where he had a documented altercation with another man. During the next few days, Wallis was accused of attempting to find the man, threatening two separate individuals, and going so far as to break into a mutual friend's home to find information on the man's whereabouts.

Florence Police arrested Jon Thomas Wallis for stalking, making terrorist threats, and burglary. Was he found not guilty? No, it seems for whatever reason, a grand jury did not indict Wallis. According to legal sources, the grand jury could have considered that all testimony came from friends of the alleged victim, or that possibly the investigating officer was unable to testify for whatever reason. This in itself proves Wallis neither innocent nor guilty.



Trafficker:

In October 2010, police arrested Wallis and his wife on charges of trafficking in marijuana. Authorities found drugs having a street value of $75,000.00 in their modest apartment, along with two hand guns, three rifles, and a large amount of ammunition.



In October 2011, Jon Thomas Wallis, having been convicted of the trafficking charge, was sentenced to 15 years, with three to serve and 12 on probation. The charges against Tanya Marie Wallis were dropped. 


Would-Be Wife Killer:

Jon Thomas Wallis of Florence was well known to police before he allegedly shot his wife during a domestic dispute. Wallis, 31 in 2011, claimed his wife Tanya Marie Wallis, then 28, shot herself in the bedroom of their Quail Run Apartment located off Chisholm Road.

According to a local paramedic, even though Mrs. Wallis sustained severe head injuries, the weather on April 27th prevented her being transported to the NICU at Huntsville Hospital. After treatment at ECM, Mrs. Wallis improved rapidly and spoke with Florence police who promptly arrested the Ink Slinger.
  
In December 2011, a Lauderdale County jury convicted Wallis of the attempted murder of his wife, a Class A felony. In February 2012, a Lauderdale County Circuit Court judge gave the local tattoo artist a sentence of life with the chance of parole. Tommy Wallis had previously seemed to admire tattoos of guns; we doubt he feels the same way now.

 
Jon Thomas Wallis won't be eligible for parole until April 2026. Those who wish to go on record as opposing Wallis' parole may write:

Alabama Board of Pardons & Paroles
Re: Jon Thomas Wallis, AIS 280574
Post Office Box 302405
Montgomery, Alabama 36130-2405

Telephone: (334) 353-7771, 353-8067
FAX: (334) 242-1809


The above account was taken from blogs originally published in Shoalanda Speaks.

Thursday, March 30, 2017

George Weakley Rhodes: The Bathtub Killer



George Weakley Rhodes, sometimes known as "Old School," is no stranger to violence against women. In 2002, he and Marsha Simpson worked together for the City of Florence Recycling Program. Friends said the two had dated, but quarreled.

Prosecutors say Rhodes waited outside Simpson's home in East Florence for her to return. No one can be sure of his plans, but we can be sure that when Rhodes saw his former girlfriend walking home in the company of another man, he drew his gun and shot several times. No one was injured, but Florence Police charged Rhodes with attempted murder. After a deliberation of only an hour, a jury found George Rhodes not guilty of the charges.

We can understand how they came to their verdict. After all, who doesn't take a gun to visit his old girlfriend? Who doesn't fire the gun in her direction because he's so elated to see her with a rival? Obviously, this verdict falls under the category of "What Were They Thinking?"

Rhodes had previously led a less than perfect life. Among his many previous charges were a 1971 armed robbery of a grocery store on West Mobile Street and a 1999 armed home invasion style robbery of an East Florence residence. We will assume Rhodes' record of violence was not allowed into testimony at his 2002 trial.

Neither did Rhodes remain a stranger to law enforcement after his acquittal. In January 2006, he was arrested in Florence for forgery. In March 2007, Rhodes was arrested in a drug bust targeting dealers who waited for children at a school bus stop on the corner of Cedar and West Mobile Streets. At this time, Rhodes was charged only with possession.

Drugs seemed to play a large role in "Old School's" life, but so did violence--probably each fueling the other. In September 2010, the 61 year-old Rhodes agreed to a plea bargain in the death of Deborah Elaine Oldham Paulk. The south-central Florence woman was murdered in her bath tub either during or after an ongoing New Year's party in January of 2005. Paulk may not have had the best taste in recreational activities or friends, but murder is murder. Court records indicate Rhodes threatened to kill Paulk's mother if she testified against him.

George Weakley Rhodes served only five years in prison; however, we understand Paulk's family felt there was no choice if they wanted a 100% guarantee Rhodes would serve any time at all in a case that was already five years old. Perhaps George, by then in his seventh decade and with a body damaged by years of drug abuse, did not find prison so easy. Nevertheless, Ms. Paulk deserved more.



In June 2015, Florence police arrested George Weakly Rhodes, Jr, 66, in the assault of two men in East Florence. Reports indicated that Rhodes and several other subjects were drinking at a residence when a dispute over alcohol turned violent. Rhodes was accused of assaulting the two men with a nail clad piece of lumber, and both victims were treated at a local hospital for their injuries. Rhodes was arrested without incident and was taken to the Lauderdale County Detention Center without bond.

George Weakley Rhodes Jr., aka Old School, aka the Bathtub Killer, is currently serving a three year sentence in the Limestone Correctional Facility. His anticipated release date is June 14, 2018. According to the Department of Corrections, Rhodes will not have a parole consideration date; this is the sixth state incarceration for the former drug dealer known as “Old School.” He will be 68 years-old when released; we don't think this is the end of the story.


Taken from material first published in Shoalanda Speaks and Pen-N-Sword. PNS material used with permission.